November 24, 2017.  My following letter was published in the Citrus County Chronicle on this date.

Thanks to Senator Simpson, and to the Chronicle for its November 19 Opinion supporting his plan to improve the quality of county waters by removing and replacing polluting septic tanks with a modern central sewer system.

I’ve read far too many articles, commentaries and opinions praising recent misguided efforts to “save our waters” or “save our bay” by raking, harvesting, vacuuming or dredging up deposited muck and Lyngbya.  They generally fail to mention the resultant impacts of increased turbidity and the accelerated dispersal of deposited nutrients and Lyngbya to adjacent areas, thereby promoting further algae blooms and facilitating the expansion of Lyngbya infestations.

Rarely, have I seen acknowledgements that such efforts are temporary, requiring repeated cleaning, over and over again, as nutrients, notably nitrogen and phosphorus, from sewage effluent and fast-release fertilizers continue entering our aquifer and surface waters.

Many articles have gone on to applaud the planting of Rockstar vegetation in these “cleaned” areas, often not mentioning the unsightly fences needed to protect these patches from the next wave of manatees seeking a nice snack to munch on.  Seagrass and other macrophyte planting programs should be considered, but only once the causes of their demise are addressed, and conditions favoring their survival over competitive nutrient loving nuisance species are achieved.

I’ve yet to read an authoritative report confirming any lasting effect of these “clean-up” efforts, or any sustained reestablishment of the Rockstar vegetation once the fencing has been removed welcoming the manatees in to chow down.

It’s about time we abandon these quick fixes which simply address the symptoms of the problem, and redirect the millions of dollars wasted on them to tackle its root causes: nutrient overloading and retention resulting from septic tank leakage and over-fertilization.

Our elected representatives need to recognize our budget limitations and become more fiscally responsible by prioritizing cost-effective programs and actions that will make a lasting difference.  Resources are simply not available to fund everyone’s pet projects, no matter how well-intentioned.  Supporting ineffective efforts may create a few jobs and help gain a few more votes, but that’s not what good leaders do.

Ditto for half-hearted fast-release fertilizer restrictions.

Other high priority actions deserving of funding and attention to protect our waters include wetland restoration to aid in nutrient filtration and the curtailment of groundwater pumping throughout the watershed to improve spring flows and increase flushing activity.  Amendment 1 was recently approved by voters to fund just such programs.

It’s probably too late to restore Kings Bay to former Rainbow River standards, but let’s not let it become the next Indian River Lagoon or Lake Okeechobee, where nutrient overloading and resultant algae blooms have devastated once diverse ecosystems.

Hopefully, by next year’s Save our Waters Week, our leaders will be doing just that by placing their highest priority on supporting Senator Simpson’s funding proposal.

Gary Rankel
Citrus Hills, Florida